Colombian Candies; Part 1

I enjoy the snack foods and candies of other countries; there always seem to be things you just can’t find anywhere else. Of course this goes for all the food in places, but snack foods are little culture bites and there’s just something about them. There is Pocky and green tea Kit Kats in Japan, Funions in the US, lebkuchen in Germany, and now we’d like to show you some of the things here, particularly candy things. Starting with gum/taffy.

What is probably immediately noticeable is that these are all kind of small. Little servings to satisfy your craving and not leave you with a pocket of leftovers that ends up all melted and goey (maybe this is a personal problem…). They are also sold by people with carts on the street, for very cheap, and so even more easily acquired and gobbled up.

Chiclets are a classic. (Chicle is the word for gum, by the way) They come two at a time in these boxes you just break open. Crafty packaging.

Frunas remind me of Laffy Taffy and those really hardknock-off Starburst-like things I can’t remember the name of. (Help me out Sma? We used to eat them because they were vegan.) Despite being different flavors they are all white like this, surprise every time! I think I am a new fan.

 Despite their oddly American-looking packaging, Barrilete are various bright colors inside. They are also similar to Laffy Taffy and are pretty delicious, although I can’t quite put my finger on what flavor they are. The one we found was filled (relleno) which I don’t think really added or detracted much. Clearly Manu enjoyed it.

Bubaloo (pronounced boob-a-loo) is another classic gum thing, and is filled with gooey stuff.

Sparkies are reminiscent of Skittles. If you think you have seen them before, you possible have—they are made by Cadbury and were at some point in the states but aren’t really anymore.

The other little green thing up there I forgot to take a picture of is this suuuper sour gum. Good stuff.

So there’s your sugar for the day. (We bought a fruit for Friday, but it wasn’t ripe) There are also so many chocolate things, peanut things, etc. that we will tell you about later so that should you encounter them you can appropriately decide what you want.

See Part 2 here.

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About syd

I like beats & beets
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10 Responses to Colombian Candies; Part 1

  1. vocabat says:

    I had those cinnamon Chiclets countless times and NEVER realized you could just open the box like that. I very methodically opened the ends with my fingernails–what a square! Ö

  2. jessi says:

    “Frunas remind me of Laffy Taffy and those really hardknock-off Starburst-like things I can’t remember the name of.”

    Do you mean Now and Laters?

  3. Sarah says:

    Sydbid-

    Are those Bubaloo things owned or related to bubbalicious in America? Because the packaging looks almost exactly the same. Also, I’m commenting on your blog! Weird

    • syd says:

      Well, after some deep Wikipedia research it turns out Bubbaloo debuted in Mexico and Brazil but is now owned by Cadbury Adams who is owned by Kraft, who indeed owns Bubblicious. But Bubblicious didn’t originally have a liquid center and was in response to Hubba Bubba. I guess the packaging is pretty similar…weird gum histories.

      also yeah, I’m glad it took a candy post to finally get you to comment?

  4. moises says:

    frunas only come in one flavor r u serious?! lmao i think it’s hilarious that you think banana (that colors flavor) “tastes different every time”… i’m colombian and it’s all about the the pink ;) go try new flavors. also, your not supposed to chew them immediately like a starburst, you give em a minute to soften up while you enjoy the flavors. and finally, two very important last words: JET CHOCOLATE.

    • syd says:

      Whaaat we only found white Frunas, I guess more hunting is required. Personally I’m not a big fan of the Jet chocolate, but we talked about it in Colombian Candies Pt. 2!

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